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Data Sources Available on DataPlace

Summary

Data Sources vs. Boundary Types

Legend : - Full Data p - Partial Data
  Census Tract Zip Code Place County Metropolitan Area State Nation
ACIP (CBP)      
ACIP (NES)      
ACIP (OES)          
Building Permits Survey     p p p
Business Patterns   p
Census p
Fair Market Rent (FMR)          
Federal Expenditures     p p
Foreclosure Needs Scores   p          
HMDA   p
HMDA High-Cost Indicators   p
HMDA Housing Market Indicators   p
HUD area median family income      
IRS   p
NCES
NCES (Dissim)            
Population Estimates     p
Population Projections          
Section 8 Indicators  
Special Tabulation  
Vital Statistics CDC       p  

Data Sources vs. Periods

  1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030
ACIP (CBP)                                            
ACIP (NES)                                            
ACIP (OES)                                              
Building Permits Survey                
Business Patterns                                  
Census                                              
Fair Market Rent (FMR)                                  
Federal Expenditures                                      
Foreclosure Needs Scores                                              
HMDA                          
HMDA High-Cost Indicators                                                
HMDA Housing Market Indicators                                                
HUD area median family income                                
IRS                                            
NCES                            
NCES (Dissim)                            
Population Estimates                                      
Population Projections                                      
Section 8 Indicators                                                
Special Tabulation                                                
Vital Statistics CDC                                  

Details

ACIP (CBP)

Dataset Name: ACIP Arts Data: County and Zip Business Patterns Years: 2003 to 2005 Geographic Levels Available: ZCTA, County, State, Metropolitan Area, Region, Division, Nation Originator: U.S. Census Bureau The Arts and Culture Indicators Project compiled County Business Patterns and Zip Business Patterns data on arts-related industries. The Business Patterns files provide economic data by industry, derived from the Standard Statistical Establishment List, a file of all known companies maintained by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data for this file are obtained from Census Bureau programs, as well as administrative records from the Internal Revenue Service, the Social Security Administration, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Business Patterns data cover most of the country.s economic activity, but exclude data on the self-employed and most government workers. In cases where the source files suppressed employment data to protect an individual employer.s information, the DataPlace files substituted a derived measure. Geographic adjustments were made in linking the business data reported for zip codes to Zip Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs). For a fuller discussion of methodology issues, please see the DataPlace analytic brief Business Patterns And Trends: National Summary (2005).

Years Available:   2005, 2004, 2003
Geographic Levels Available:   County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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ACIP (NES)

The Arts and Culture Indicators in Community Building Project (ACIP) is an exploratory and experimental effort to develop arts and culture neighborhood indicators for use in local planning, policymaking, and community building. Launched in 1996 with the support of the Creativity and Culture division of the Rockefeller Foundation, it operates in conjunction with the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP). The project operates at the local level in collaboration with various kinds of organizations and individuals including community builders, arts administrators, artists, funders and applied researchers. The project seeks to create the concepts, tools, and language necessary to integrate arts and culture into quality of life measures. Moreover, it actively encourages the inclusion of arts and culture within indicator systems.

Years Available:   2005, 2004, 2003
Geographic Levels Available:   County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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ACIP (OES)

The Arts and Culture Indicators in Community Building Project (ACIP) is an exploratory and experimental effort to develop arts and culture neighborhood indicators for use in local planning, policymaking, and community building. Launched in 1996 with the support of the Creativity and Culture division of the Rockefeller Foundation, it operates in conjunction with the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP). The project operates at the local level in collaboration with various kinds of organizations and individuals including community builders, arts administrators, artists, funders and applied researchers. The project seeks to create the concepts, tools, and language necessary to integrate arts and culture into quality of life measures. Moreover, it actively encourages the inclusion of arts and culture within indicator systems.

Years Available:   2006, 2005
Geographic Levels Available:   State, Nation

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Building Permits Survey

The U.S. Census Bureau releases annual counts of privately-owned residential units authorized by building permits, based on a mail survey of local building permit offices. The data relate to new housing units intended for occupancy, and exclude hotels, manufactured housing, and group residential structures. When a report is not received, data are either imputed or obtained from a separate survey on housing starts. Construction is undertaken for all but a small share of permitted units. Not all areas of the country require building permits for construction. Nationally less than 3 percent of housing units are constructed in areas not requiring permits, but this proportion varies greatly among states. The number of permit offices surveyed was expanded from 19,000 to 20,000 in 2004, so earlier counts for counties and larger geographies may not represent the exact area surveyed in the latest series. For more information, visit http://www.census.gov/const/www/permitsindex.html.

Years Available:   2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990
Geographic Levels Available:   Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Business Patterns

County and Zip Business Patterns provide data on business establishments and employment by industry and establishment size. The information is derived from the Standard Statistical Establishment List, a file of all known companies maintained by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Bureau obtains data for the list from its own programs as well as administrative files from the Internal Revenue Service, the Social Security Administration, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Business Patterns data cover most of the country's economic activity, but exclude data on the self-employed and most government workers. In cases when the source files suppress employment data to protect confidentiality, the DataPlace files substitute a derived measure. Adjustments were made in linking the business data reported by zip code to Zip Code Tabulation Areas . For a fuller discussion of methodology issues, please see the DataPlace analytic brief Business Patterns And Trends: National Summary (2005).

Years Available:   2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998
Geographic Levels Available:   Zip Code, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Census

Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau conducts a national household survey, producing the richest source of nationally available small-area data. The federal government uses Decennial Census data for apportioning congressional seats, for identifying distressed areas, and for many other activities. Census data are collected using two survey forms: the short form and the long form. Short form information is collected on every person and includes basic characteristics, such as age, sex, and race. The long form is sent to one out of every six households and collects more detailed information, such as income, housing characteristics, and employment. Most of the indicators in DataPlace are from the long form and thus are estimates based on the sample of households. These values may differ considerably from the same indicators based on the short form data, particularly for small areas. For more information, visit the Census Web site at http://www.census.gov/main/www/cen2000.html.

Years Available:   2000, 1990
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Zip Code, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Fair Market Rent (FMR)

Dataset Name: Fair Market Rents Years: 2001 to 2008 Geographic Levels Available: Minor Civil Division, County, Metropolitan Area Originator: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) annually publishes estimates of Fair Market Rents (FMRs) for calculating subsidies under the Housing Choice Voucher program. The estimates include the shelter rent plus the cost of utilities, except telephone. FMRs are produced for non-metropolitan counties and fair market rent areas, which generally follow OMB metropolitan area boundaries. HUD transitioned to 2005 metropolitan definitions in 2006. FMRs represent either the 40th or 50th percentile within the rent distribution of standard-quality rental units. The rents are based on units occupied by recent movers (those who moved into the unit in the past 15 months), excluding public housing and units less than 2 years old. HUD uses the Decennial Census to set base rents, and then updates them with the American Housing Survey, Consumer Price Index, and local telephone surveys. For more information on FMRs, visit http://www.huduser.org/datasets/fmr.html.

Years Available:   2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001
Geographic Levels Available:   County, Metropolitan Area

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Federal Expenditures

The U.S. Census Bureau Governments Division annually publishes the Consolidated Federal Funds Report (CFFR), fiscal year statistics of Federal Government expenditures or obligations in state and substate areas, including the District of Columbia. The data are obtained from information systems in various Federal Government agencies; these data have been consolidated and tabulated in a standard format. Program-specific CFFR indicators have been created for DataPlace for states and counties in the following categories: direct payments for individuals including retirement and disability, other direct payments, grants, procurement contracts, and salaries and wages. Loans and insurance programs are excluded. In addition, for DataPlace, each program has been coded by OMB budget function. For details about the functional areas, visit http://12.46.245.173/pls/portal30/catalog.BUDGET_FUNC_CD_RPT.show. For more information about the CFFR, visit http://www.census.gov/govs/www/cffr.html.

Years Available:   2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000
Geographic Levels Available:   Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Foreclosure Needs Scores

Dataset Name: Foreclosure Needs Scores Years: 2009 Geographic Levels Available: ZCTA Originator: Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) To help states and communities make informed decisions about how to allocate and spend the Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds, the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) developed foreclosure needs scores"" for ZIP Codes. These scores incorporate measures of subprime lending, foreclosures, delinquency, and vacancies. The scores range from 0 to 100 and measure need relative to the zip code with the highest need within each state. The main data source at the zip code level is McDash Analytics, but data from the Census Bureau Estimates program, the American Community Survey, the Residential Finance Survey, the Mortgage Bankers Association's National Delinquency Survey, and the U.S. Postal Service were used to adjust the McDash totals. Full documentation is available at http://www.housingpolicy.org/foreclosure-response.html.

Years Available:   2009, 2008
Geographic Levels Available:   Zip Code

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HMDA

The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) requires most lending institutions to report mortgage loan applications, including the outcome of the application, information about the loan and applicant, and location of the property. In 2004, FFIEC expanded the data to include structure type, lien status, and if the loan had high interest rates. FFIEC collects the data in order to determine whether financial institutions are meeting a community’s housing credit needs; to target community development funds to attract private investment; and to identify possible discriminatory lending patterns. The reporting requirements are based on the level of institutional assets and the number of loans originated in metro areas. In DataPlace, the loan-level data are summarized for various geographic levels into indicators on the racial and income distribution of borrowers, denial rates by race and income, and loans from subprime lenders by race. For more information about HMDA, visit http://www.ffiec.gov/hmda

Years Available:   2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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HMDA High-Cost Indicators

The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) requires most lending institutions to report mortgage loan applications, including the outcome of the application, information about the loan, and location of the property. In 2004, FFIEC expanded the data to include structure type, lien status, and if the loan had high interest rates. FFIEC collects the data in order to determine whether financial institutions are meeting a community's housing credit needs; to target community development funds to attract private investment; and to identify possible discriminatory lending patterns. The reporting requirements are based on the level of institutional assets and the number of loans originated in metro areas. While the DataPlace web site includes hundreds of HMDA indicators on a wide range of topics, the Foreclosure-Response website displays only key indicators on mortgage loans with high interest rates (as a proxy for foreclosure risk), summing all loans from 2004 to 2006. For more information about HMDA, visit http:\\www.ffiec.gov\hmda.

Years Available:   2006
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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HMDA Housing Market Indicators

The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) requires most lending institutions to report mortgage loan applications, including the outcome of the application, information about the loan, and location of the property. In 2004, FFIEC expanded the data to include structure type, lien status, and if the loan had high interest rates. FFIEC collects the data in order to determine whether financial institutions are meeting a community's housing credit needs; to target community development funds to attract private investment; and to identify possible discriminatory lending patterns. The reporting requirements are based on the level of institutional assets and the number of loans originated in metro areas. While the DataPlace web site includes hundreds of HMDA indicators on a wide range of topics, the Foreclosure-Response website displays only key indicators on housing market strength for 2007. For more information about HMDA, visit http:\\www.ffiec.gov\hmda.

Years Available:   2007
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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HUD area median family income

Each year, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) calculates median family incomes and income limits for metropolitan areas and non-metropolitan counties using the Fair Market Rent area defini¬tions, which generally follow OMB metropolitan area boundaries. HUD also calculates median family incomes for each state. Median family income estimates for metropolitan counties are not developed separately, but rather represent the estimates for the entire metropolitan area of which they are part. HUD uses the Decennial Census to set base income levels, and then updates them with data from the Current Population Survey, the American Community Survey (ACS), and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. HUD then makes adjustments for family size and for areas that have unusually high or low income-to-housing cost relationships. As a caution, HUD re-benchmarked the estimates in 2003 with 2000 Census data, resulting in an unusual number of changes from the previous year. The 2007 estimates are the first to be based on local area 2005 ACS surveys for places of 65,000 or more. Since the ACS is known to provide generally lower estimates of incomes than the 2000 Census, the 2007 HAMFI limits reflect that difference and cannot be accurately compared to HAMFI limits from 2006 and earlier. For more information on HAMFI, visit http://www.huduser.org/datasets/il.html.

Years Available:   2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999
Geographic Levels Available:   County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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IRS

The DataPlace Internal Revenue Service (IRS) data files are compiled from zip code data supplied by three divisions within the agency: Statistics of Income , E-file program, and the Stakeholder Partnership Education and Communication Office . The IRS indicators are derived from individual income tax returns and thus describe characteristics of tax filers, not households or persons. IRS indicators include information about the filer's age, income level and sources, tax credits and deductions, and tax preparation method. Counts with less than 10 observations are suppressed to protect confidentiality. Adjustments to the data were made in linking the IRS data reported for zip codes to Zip Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs). For more information, visit the IRS web site at http://www.irs.gov/taxstats/

Years Available:   2002, 2001, 2000
Geographic Levels Available:   Zip Code, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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NCES

Common Core of Data Public School Survey Years Available in DataPlace: 1995-1996 through 2005-2006 Geographic Levels Available in DataPlace: Block Group, Tract, ZCTA, Place, County, MCD, Metropolitan Area, State, Division, Region, Nation Originator: National Center for Education Statistics National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) conducts an annual survey of state education agencies to obtain data for every public elementary and secondary school in the United States and its territories, which it then compiles and publishes as the Common Core of Data Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey (CCD). The CCD has two main purposes: 1) to provide an official listing of public elementary and secondary schools and school districts in the nation as a basis for samples for other NCES surveys 2) to provide basic descriptive statistics on public elementary and secondary schools. Mostly derived from administrative records, data cover school characteristics such as the school level, grades taught, student-teacher ratio, and federal Title I funding eligibility and also provide information on enrolled student characteristics, including race/ethnicity, free/reduced price lunch eligibility, migrant status, and gender. For more detailed information on the CCD, visit the NCES website: http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/pubschuniv.asp. DataPlace provides these data for all open schools as aggregate indicators at various geographic levels (summary data).

Years Available:   2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Zip Code, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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NCES (Dissim)

Common Core of Data Public School Survey Years Available in DataPlace: 1995-1996 through 2005-2006 Geographic Levels Available in DataPlace: Metropolitan Area Originator: National Center for Education Statistics Dissimilarity Indices National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) conducts an annual survey of state education agencies to obtain data for every public elementary and secondary school in the United States and its territories, which it then compiles and publishes as the Common Core of Data Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey (CCD). The CCD has two main purposes: 1) to provide an official listing of public elementary and secondary schools and school districts in the nation as a basis for samples for other NCES surveys, and 2) to provide basic descriptive statistics on public elementary and secondary schools. Mostly derived from administrative records, data include information on enrolled student characteristics, including race/ethnicity and free/reduced price lunch eligibility. Using these data, DataPlace calculates indices of dissimilarity for metropolitan areas, which measure school segregation between racial/ethnic subgroups and between free/reduced price lunch eligible and non-free/reduced price lunch eligible students. For more detailed information on the CCD, visit the NCES website: http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/pubschuniv.asp.

Years Available:   2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996
Geographic Levels Available:   Metropolitan Area

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Population Estimates

The U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates Program publishes estimates as of July 1 each year for resident population and housing units. With each new issue of estimates, the Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. The Bureau does not publish housing unit estimates for places. The Bureau uses statistical models that combine census and administrative records information to produce estimates consistent with the last decennial census counts. Data sources contributing to population estimates include federal tax records, Medicare records, state school enrollments, vital statistics, and group quarters information. The Bureau calculates change in housing units through data on building permits, mobile home shipments, and housing unit loss. For more information, visit the program's web site at http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.php.

Years Available:   2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000
Geographic Levels Available:   Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Population Projections

Every two years, the U.S. Census Bureau publishes state population projections, estimating the future population through 2030. The state projections represents an interim update to incorporate the results of Census 2000, and will be revised to be consistent with a revised set of national population projections. Projected numbers illustrate plausible courses of future population change based on assumptions about future births, deaths, international migration, and domestic migration. The components of population change (fertility, mortality, and net migration) are projected separately for each birth cohort (persons born in a given year). The base population is then advanced each year by using projected survival rates and net international migration by single year of age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. For more details, visit the projections web site at http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/popproj.html.

Years Available:   2030, 2025, 2020, 2015, 2010, 2005
Geographic Levels Available:   State, Nation

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Section 8 Indicators

The Section 8 data are derived from the Multifamily Assistance and Section 8 Contracts (formerly known as Section 8 Expiring Use) Database, which is available every month from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Web site at http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/mfh/exp/mfhdiscl.cfm. The database represents a snapshot at a point in time of all multifamily assistance and Section 8 project-based subsidy contracts. Project-based subsidies are tied to specific, privately owned rental units, not provided to tenants as with Section 8 vouchers. In DataPlace, the Section 8 point (address-level) data provide selected information about each of these subsidy contracts, including physical location of the property, subsidy expiration date and contract status, total number of assisted units by bedroom size, number of units in the entire property, and overall average ratio of gross contract rents to Fair Market Rents. Address-level data have also been summed to various geographic levels.

Years Available:   2004
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Special Tabulation

The Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data file is a detailed tabulation of the Decennial Census sponsored by HUD. It includes extensive data on a variety of physical and financial housing characteristics and needs categorized by HUD-defined income limits (30, 50, and 80 percent of area median income) and HUD-specified household types. As with the long form in the Decennial Census, CHAS indicators are estimates based on a sample of households. These special tabulation data are used by local governments for housing planning as part of the Consolidated Planning process and by HUD for various allocation formulas to distribute funds to localities. For more information, visit the HUDUser Web site at http://www.huduser.org/datasets/cp.html

Years Available:   2000
Geographic Levels Available:   Census Tract, Place, County, Metropolitan Area, State, Nation

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Vital Statistics CDC

Vital Statistics Public-Use Data Years Available in DataPlace: 1996 - 2003 Geographic Levels Available in DataPlace: County, State, Division, Region, Nation Originator: National Center for Health Statistics The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) collects U.S. birth certificates for the nation. Counts of births include U.S. residents and non-residents and are reported by the mother.s county of residence. The data also include information on the child's weight, maternal race and age, and use of prenatal care. County-level data is only reported for counties with populations greater than 100,000. Up until 2003, NCHS based the criteria on the 1990 Census. From 2003 forward, NCHS uses population from Census 2000, so upcoming data for 2004 will be reported for the additional 66 counties that qualify. NCHS also publishes the number of deaths of children under 1-year-old that live in the United States. Mortality data is linked with the child.s birth certificate and compiled by maternal county of residence and maternal race. See http://wonder.cdc.gov/ for more information and additional indicators including gestational age, infant cause of death, and maternal risk factors.

Years Available:   2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996
Geographic Levels Available:   County, State, Nation

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Other Available Data

Residential Demographic Multipliers

The Rutgers University Center for Urban Policy Research produced a special tabulation of the Census 2000 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) that provides demographic multipliers for new housing units. The multipliers, which were developed under a grant from the Fannie Mae Foundation, are estimates of the total number of persons, school-age children, and public school children who occupy newly constructed housing of varying types. The multipliers are broken down by age and school grade and are presented separately for housing units categorized by structure type (single-family detached, single-family attached, mobile homes, 2-4 unit structures, and 5 or more unit structures), size (number of bedrooms), tenure (owner- or renter-occupied), and value or rent. (This data is available only in PDF format through the links below. It is not integrated into other DataPlace sections such as Maps, Rankings, etc.)

Years Available:   2000
Geographic Levels Available:   State, Nation Source: Rutgers University, Center for Urban Policy Research

To access a PDF file containing multipliers and accompanying documentation for the nation, any state, or the District of Columbia, click on a link below.

US Totals

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
Washington, D.C.
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

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